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64 Plate New Car Registrations in September 2014 Best For in 10 years

September 2014 has been the best September for a decade for new car sales, although March 2014 was even higher.

The new 10 year record for September new car sales comes for a number of reasons:

  • improving UK economy and confidenence
  • attraction of more fuel efficient cars
  • attraction of new cars with lower CO2 emmissions and lower road tax costs
  • good deals on new cars from key manufacturers
  • buyers fixing low finance deals now for fear of higher interest rates coming

We posted a blog update earlier this week about the strain on the .Gov road tax web page and long delays in purchasing road tax online. That is from 1 October 2014 so the trend may well be contining into October.

The SMMT predict the new car market cooling slightly going forward.

Best Selling Car Models September 2014

The best selling cars in September 2014 according to the SMMT were:


  1. Ford Fiesta - 23,266
  2. Ford Focus - 13,508
  3. Volkswagen Golf - 13,011
  4. Vauhall Corsa - 12,506
  5. Volkswagen Polo - 10,312
  6. Fiat 500 - 9,122
  7. Vauxhall Astra - 8,861
  8. Audi - A3 - 7,317
  9. Peugeot 208 - 6,968
  10. Nissan Qashqai - 6,847

The Ford Fiesta is regularly at the top of the UKs best selling car models, and there is no change in September 2014.

Best Selling Cars 2014 January To September (Year To Date)

The best selling cars in 2014 to date are:

  1. Ford Fiesta - 106,930
  2. Ford Focus - 67,015
  3. Vauhall Corsa - 62,693
  4. Volkswagen Golf - 58,664
  5. Vauxhall Astra - 47,482
  6. Nissan Qashqai - 38,920
  7. Volkswagen Polo - 36,772
  8. Audi - A3 - 35,596
  9. Fiat 500 - 35,032
  10. BMW 3 Series - 29,655

Best Selling Cars By Manufacturer 2014 up to September 2014

The above broken down by car manaufacturer would be as follows:



This makes Ford the car manufacturer with the highest number of new cars registered in the UK for September 2014, and the start of the 64 plate registrations, with Volksgagen coming second even if you count Volkswagen and Audi together as a single manufacturer.

425,861 new cars registered in the key month of September, a rise of 5.6% and the biggest September since 2004.

New ‘64’ numberplate boosts volumes, with September marking the 31st consecutive month of growth in the new car market.
Registrations for the year-to-date reach 1,958,196 – up 9.1% on January-September 2013.

Mike Hawes, SMMT Chief Executive, said, “September’s strong performance underlined the continuing robustness of the UK new car market, particularly in the context of last September’s bumper volumes.

“Demand for the new 64-plate has been boosted by intensifying confidence in the UK economy, with consumers attracted by a wide range of exciting, increasingly fuel-efficient, new cars. In the months since March – which saw an 18% jump in registrations – the growth has shown signs of levelling off as the market starts to find its natural running rate.”

The growth in new car sales in the UK has continued at such a rate setting new records for growth in the UK car market beating previous records for continous growth last set in the 1980s. 

Adaptive Cruise Control how does it work?

Following Google's announcement and our blog post yesterday about Google's plan to expand their self driving cars technology we thought we'd add a post about another relatively recent automated driving development - "adaptive cruise control" or ACC for short.

Volkswagen has been one of the leading car manufacturers to add adaptive cruise control as an option for many of its models.

Adaptive cruise control uses radar controlled front assist traffic monitoring systems to monitor the distance from the car or vehicle in front.

The older technology of ordinary cruise control simply keeps the car or vehicle at a steady speed.

However adaptive cruise control as it monitors the distance to the vehicle in front and reduces or increases the speed of your vehicle to maintain a steady distance from the car in front to help avoid collisions.

For drivers who regularly undertake long journeys adaptive cruise control can make those journeys more comfortable avoiding that right leg ache you can get maintaining the accelerator pedal in a fairly steady position.

How does adaptive cruise control work?

The ACC radar in Volkswagen's at least has a range of up to 200 metres and the angle of the radar beam is 12 degrees.

The radar sensor is located in the front of the car and calculates the distance to the vehicle in front and your cars relative speed to it. The ACC system also calculates the location of your car on multilane roads.

Adaptive cruise control does not however mean that a driver does not need to be fully aware of what's going on around him or her.

However many ACC systems do not detect crash barriers or stationary vehicles or objects in front, so if there is a queue of stationary cars in front the driver still needs to be alert and break manually when needed. It is not quite yet fully automated driving more driving assistance.

However adaptive cruise control is no doubt safer than non-adaptive cruise control.

It isn't likely to be that long before adaptive cruise control combines with other technologies to monitor stationary objects and vehicles or pedestrians to assist the driver even further.